One of a Kind: Undergraduate Senior Seminar Art Exhibit

Xinyu Wu, What should be tied, 2018, 23 x 30 x 23 cm

A new student show “One of a Kind” will be on display at the Central Reading Room in the Melville Library between November 6 and December 10, 2018.

Nobuho Nagasawa, the Art Studio Faculty Member who curated the show, described what’s on display in this way:

“In the new technological age, the role of the library has changed with the rise of the Internet, E-books, Kindles, and other means of reading.  Nevertheless, books have never failed to transport new ideas, relay messages, provoke thoughts, and challenge viewpoints. In this exhibition, “One of a Kind,” I asked each student in the senior seminar class to expand their individual art practice and to create a site-responsive work that is related to the function of the library as a beacon of knowledge, and a place for exploration.”

MFA Student Maggie Avolio Featured in New American Paintings

In a recent issue of New American Paintings, current MFA Maggie Avolio was featured and profiled and had her artist statement published online. She describes her practice as being engaged in producing:

“…minimalistic artwork that exists simultaneously as painting, sculpture, and installation. Raw canvas is unwoven, torn, folded, or reconstructed to create three-dimensional form. I create marks using unconventional methods like stitching. Paint is absent from the canvas yet sometimes appears in the surrounding area, creating a new spatial identity.”

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Art History Faculty Katy Siegel was recently interviewed about her show at the Rose Art Museum. Among other reflections, she notes that:

“That earlier generation of women artists was
 not given the option of being feminists—and, even later in life, many were not interested in embracing that identity when it was on offer. Nonetheless, they faced the same issues as later generations, and enacted some of the same adaptations and solutions: playing both at femininity and masculinity as artificial roles, speaking to each other in private in a different manner than in public speech, and letting their work be filled with their own, unnamed sensibility. Female artists today are more likely to be able to say things out loud, but perhaps still run similar risks in the media and popular conceptions—being pinned down by categorical thinking about gender and identity.”

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New Work Exhibited from MFA Alum Athena LaTocha

Athena recently had the opportunity to make a new work for the Crystal Bridges Museum’s traveling exhibition “Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now, ” on display between October 05, 2018 – January 07, 2019.

For Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now, artist Athena LaTocha visited Northwest Arkansas and Pea Ridge National Military Park. The result of this visit is a work specific to the region, both the lush topography of the Ozarks as well as what the land has seen over time.

The entire cultural history of the land impacts LaTocha’s work– in this case, the Trail of Tears and the Civil War. During her visit, certain elements of the Arkansas landscape lingered: burnt trees, the smell of wet earth, sun on the rocks, and the erosion and striation of rock features. LaTocha connected the burnt wood and bluff overhangs with the experience of war and trauma in the land’s past.

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Stony Brook Art History MA Barbara Christen, author of Cass Gilbert, Life and Work, will be featured on a podcast on the topic of the Brooklyn Army Terminal (the military-site-turned-manufacturing-complex), during OPEN HOUSE NY weekend.

Faculty Member Nobuho Nagasawa’s Sculpture Featured in CODAmagazine

Art Studio Faculty Member Nobuho Nagasawa’s sculpture “Nest” that is installed in the LA Metro has been chosen to be included in castellan The editors describe the sculpture in this way:

This artwork on the station mezzanine alludes to migration and travel, a significant theme, which acknowledges the history of the immigrant community in this part of the city. An old map with images of flying birds, and a suspended spiral nest with an “egg” symbolizes “home.” The egg glows and pulsates to the rhythm of the artists’ heartbeat.

Reflecting on the histories of migration in East Los Angeles, Nagasawa’s work was completed in 2009.

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Random Acts of Flyness is a late-night series from artist Terence Nance (An Oversimplification of Her Beauty). The six-episode season explores evergreen cultural idioms such as patriarchy, white supremacy and sensuality from a new, thought-provoking perspective. Associate Professor Stephanie Dinkins will appear on the Season Finales (episode 6) where she describes her encounters with a simulated black woman, drawing upon her previous work in relation to Artificial Intelligence and Race.

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Are there any related links you would like included? : usp_custom_field : /www.green-wood.com/event/sculpture-in-gotham/

Professor Michele H. Bogart will be speaking about her new book Sculpture in Gotham on Wednesday, September 26th at 6:30 at Brooklyn‘s historic Green-Wood Cemetery. Dr. Harry Weil, Ph.D. , M.A., and B.A. in, Art History, Stony Brook University, heads up Green-Wood’s Public Programs. Tickets can be purchased online here.

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Art Professor Nobuho Nagasawa’s new public sculpture “Luminescence” at Hunter’s Point South Park is now open to visitors, and has received positive press from a number of outlets, including from6815395199 and (913) 777-5128 and who notes that:

“The isle’s dune-like upward curvature and the plantings that surround its edge contribute to a sense of enclosure, most strikingly at its top, which offers a tranquil setting to take in the skyline. It is an encounter rich in dichotomies: isolation and connection, density and openness, the natural and the machine-made.”

Additionally, Art History Professor Katy Siegal’s curated show at the Met Breuer featuring the work of sculptor Jack Whitten has been reviewed by the New York Times, which notes:

“The cross-cultural, cross-media conversations resulting from the show’s disparate objects swirl around the visitor, conveying a vital sense of how artists thrive in an aesthetic space that is porous and fluid, distilling experiences and transforming sources.”

The exhibition, which features forty sculptures and eighteen of the artist’s paintings, tomato juice until December 2nd, 2018.

Faculty Member Howardena Pindell Featured in the WSJ

 

James Panero of the Wall Street Journal wrote about Art Studio Professor Howardena Pindell’s show “What Remains to Be Seen” a 100-work retrospective now on view at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, noting that:

“With her wide-ranging style and broad use of materials, Ms. Pindell has long been a round peg in a square hole. Enigmatic at times, didactic at others, she is an innovative abstractionist who also works in photography and video.”

The show will be open until November 25, 2018.

 

 

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Stony Brook alumnus Nikki Renee Anderson will be showing work at the 24th Evanston + Vicinity Biennial, the Midwest’s largest and most prestigious juried exhibitions, offering artists an opportunity to have their work viewed by three talented curators; Sergio Gomez, Curator and Director of Exhibitions, Zhou B Art Center, Aron Packer, Owner and Director, Aron Packer Projects and Therese Quinn, Associate Professor of Art History & Director of Museum and Exhibition Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Our Biennial will be promoted and viewed by hundreds of visitors, including gallerists, curators and collectors.

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A prestigious Soros fellowship has been awarded to Stephanie Dinkins, associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of Art. Dinkins was recently named to the Open Society Foundation’s 2018 class of Soros Equality Fellows, a program intended to help incubate innovators and risk-takers striving to create and develop new ways of addressing the challenges of racial disparity and discrimination in the United States.

Through this fellowship, Professor Dinkins is developing Not the Only One (NTOO), a multigenerational memoir of one black American family told from the perspective of an artificial intelligence with an evolving intellect.

An interdisciplinary artist who investigates how artificial intelligence intersects with race, gender, aging, and the future, Professor Dinkins is particularly driven to work with communities of color to develop deep-rooted AI literacy and co-create more culturally inclusive equitable artificial intelligence. Through her NTOO project, she strives to create a new kind of artificially intelligent narrative form that uses oral history and creative storytelling methods, such interactivity, vocalization and verbal ingenuity to spark the imagination and draw more underrepresented communities into crucial conversations about AI and careers that can impact the trajectory of this far-reaching technology.